Available By

  • In-Person Icon In-Person
  • Phone Icon Phone
  • Video Icon Video
  • Email Icon Email
  • Other Icon Other/Ask

About

Educated at Penn State, Evangel, and Pepperdine Universities, Randy has been counseling family conflicts, and individuals dealing with family dysfunctions since 1977. Depression, anxiety, personality disorders, marital conflicts, sexuality issues, and parent-child conflicts are a few of the issues he helps people with. Randy is an Ordained Minister and a member of the American Association of Christian Counselors (AACC), and the American Association of Marriage & Family Therapists (AAMFT).

Randy has been married to his life-time love since 1981 and has two married sons and two grandsons. He enjoys playing drums for a worship band, and is a member of the Christian Motorcyclists Association.

Why I Became a Professional Christian Therapist

My pastor in 1977 asked me to be a bus captain that would visit kids in the Scranton Pennsylvania projects that the church board wanted to reach out to. I had been studying Engineering at Penn State for 1/2 years and agreed to entertain the kids on the "Big Green Bus with a White Roof". I would visit them on Saturday mornings and in a short time, single moms and dads asked to meet me. So, I spent many hours talking with the parents of the kids that I brought to Sunday School on the Bus. My pastor would help me process the conversations I had with parents, and one day he asked if I ever considered studying psychology? I didn't know what psychology was. But, he explained it and suggested a school that I could study both psychology and Bible. So, I applied and they accepted me.

At first I didn't know which aspect of Psychology I wanted to study, but by my senior year, it became clear that I would further study Marriage & Family Therapy. It fit my understanding of the idea that when we give account of our lives to God on Judgment Day, no one in a person's family would be allowed to advocate for me, only Jesus Himself. And, the idea that we might actually be responsible for the ways we choose to deal with others, illustrated by the idea we may be asked to not eat meat when we see that it would cause our brother to stumble. It seems as though maybe I don't fully understand how I might be responsible for someone's stumbling on my account, yet I can't use the idea that I can be held responsible for something I did to cause a person to stumble, but I can't say on Judgment Day, the responsibility for eating the forbidden fruit for me is this woman that God gave me. Studying Family therapy seemed to encapsulate both biblical truths: that I can conduct myself in a way that may negatively influence others, while I cannot use others' failures to escape my personal responsibility for my choices in handling myself with others' failures.

God has called me to help people unravel the hidden intricacies of their lives. Psychology gave me additional words and some research regarding how Man conducts his life's journey.

Send Message to Therapist

Message
 
Processing